Our social media campaign for Stalking Awareness Week 2018

Stalking is not a joke. It is something horribly serious that can be life-changing for the victim and even potentially life-threatening, as it turned out in Alice's case.

During National Stalking Awareness Week, the Alice Ruggles Trust ran a social media campaign with a different message each day.

 

Monday's message

On the first day of National Stalking Awareness Week we focused on the dangers of cyberstalking.


For advice about cyberstalking, visit the National Stalking Helpline website or call 101 to contact the police.

Please share our message! It could save someone’s life.


Our website also contains some pointers to good advice about what to do if you think you are being stalked. Please see our Awareness page.

The Alice Ruggles Trust is a member of the National Stalking Consortium, a group of like-minded charities working together to tackle stalking and help reduce the risks for victims.

 

Tuesday's message

On the second day we were thinking about the more traditional image of stalking, where someone is watching you.


For advice about stalking, visit the National Stalking Helpline website or call 101 to contact the police.

Please share our message! It could save someone’s life.


Our website also contains some pointers to good advice about what to do if you think you are being stalked. Please see our Awareness page.

The Alice Ruggles Trust is a member of the National Stalking Consortium, a group of like-minded charities working together to tackle stalking and help reduce the risks for victims.

 

Wednesday's message

On the third day we were considering some things that may be part of a stalking campaign and not initially seem like stalking.


For advice about stalking, visit the National Stalking Helpline website or call 101 to contact the police.

Please share our message! It could save someone’s life.


Our website also contains some pointers to good advice about what to do if you think you are being stalked. Please see our Awareness page.

The Alice Ruggles Trust is a member of the National Stalking Consortium, a group of like-minded charities working together to tackle stalking and help reduce the risks for victims.

 

Thursday's message

On the fourth day we were thinking about the controlling aspect of stalking. There are very clear links between coercive control and stalking. Identifying controlling behaviour can be difficult as it is often masked as caring.


For advice about stalking, visit the National Stalking Helpline website or call 101 to contact the police.

Please share our message! It could save someone’s life.


Our website also contains some pointers to good advice about what to do if you think you are being stalked. Please see our Awareness page.

The Alice Ruggles Trust is a member of the National Stalking Consortium, a group of like-minded charities working together to tackle stalking and help reduce the risks for victims.

 

Friday's message

Finally, on the last day we were focusing on the danger of obsessive behaviour. This is what makes stalking so very dangerous since an obsessive person will not be thinking of the consequences for themselves. They will not be afraid of being arrested as all that matters to them is their obsession.


For advice about stalking, visit the National Stalking Helpline website or call 101 to contact the police.

Please share our message! It could save someone’s life.


Our website also contains some pointers to good advice about what to do if you think you are being stalked. Please see our Awareness page.

The Alice Ruggles Trust is a member of the National Stalking Consortium, a group of like-minded charities working together to tackle stalking and help reduce the risks for victims.